4 Scams Aimed at the Elderly and What You Can Do

No Comments
Scams Aimed at the Elderly | Alliance Senior Care

4 Scams Targeted at Elderly that You Need to Avoid

The amount of cybercrime and fraud aimed at elderly seems always to be on the rise. Here are several scams to be aware of and share with your elderly loved ones so they can protect themselves.

Grandkid Scam

Here’s how they work:

You get a call: “Grandma, I need money for bail.” Or money for a medical bill. Or some other kind of trouble. The caller says it’s urgent — and tells you to keep it a secret.

But is the caller who you think it is? Scammers are good at pretending to be someone they’re not. They can be convincing: sometimes using information from social networking sites, or hacking into your loved one’s email account, to make it seem more real. And they’ll pressure you to send money before you have time to think.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Check it out. Look up your grandkid’s phone number yourself, or call another family member.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may not have gotten one of these calls, but chances are you know someone who will get one — if they haven’t already.

Tech Support Scams

Here’s how they work:

You get a call from someone who says he’s a computer technician. He might say he’s from a well-known company like Microsoft, or maybe your internet service provider. He tells you there are viruses or other malware on your computer. He says you’ll have to give him remote access to your computer or buy new software to fix it.

But is the caller who he says he is? Judging by the complaints to the Federal Trade Commission, no. These scammers might want to sell you useless services, steal your credit card number, or get access to your computer to install malware, which could then let them see everything on your computer.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Hang up. Never give control of your computer or your credit card information to someone who calls you out of the blue.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You might know these calls are fakes, but chances are you know someone who doesn’t.

You’ve Won Scams

Here’s how they work:

You get a card, a call, or an email telling you that you won! Maybe it’s a trip or a prize, a lottery or a sweepstakes. The person calling is so excited and can’t wait for you to get your winnings.

But here’s what happens next: they tell you there’s a fee, some taxes, or customs duties to pay. And then they ask for your credit card number or bank account information, or they ask you to wire money.

Either way, you lose money instead of winning it. You don’t ever get that big prize. Instead, you get more requests for money, and more promises that you won big.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Keep your money – and your information – to yourself. Never share your financial information with someone who contacts you and claims to need it. And never wire money to anyone who asks you to.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You probably throw away these kinds of scams or hang up when you get these calls. But you probably know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

Money Mule Scams

Here’s how they work:

Someone might offer you a job. Or say you’ve won a sweepstakes. Or start an online relationship with you. Whatever the story, next they want to send you money – and then ask you to send it on to someone else. They often say to wire the money or use gift cards.

But that money is stolen. And there never was a job, a prize, or a relationship– only a scam. That scammer was trying to get you to be what some people call a “money mule.”

If you deposit a scammer’s check, it might clear. But later, when the bank finds out it’s a fake check, you’ll have to repay the bank. And if you help a scammer move stolen money – even if you didn’t know it was stolen – you could get into legal trouble.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Keep your money to yourself. Never agree to move money for someone who contacts you, even if they promise a relationship, job, or prize. You could lose money and get in legal trouble.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may see through these scams. But chances are you know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

To learn more about how In-Home Care can help improve your loved ones’ quality of life, call Alliance Senior Care at 248-274-2170.  It’s not just In-Home Care, it is Integrated Care.

Home Care Services are an excellent resource for family caregivers and seniors alike.

Alliance Senior Care Home Care services offer a wide range of services providing In-Home Care, healthcare, daily living assistance, transportation to and from Doctor’s appointments and tailored care services for additional circumstances.

If you or an aging loved-one are considering hiring a Caregiver in Bloomfield Hills, MI, please contact the caring staff at Alliance Senior Care today.
Call (248) 274-2170.

Author

Other Trending Articles

Menu